ABBA THE MUSEUM CELEBRATING RECORD VISITOR NUMBERS

30 04 2014

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Celebrating record visitor numbers of more than 350,000 since opening its doors one year ago, ABBA The Museum is proud to present new exhibits in the ‘Mamma Mia!’ room at the museum, premiering on May 7, 2014. Free entrance for visitors dressed up as ABBA on the opening day.

On May 7, ABBA The Museum and The Swedish Music Hall of Fame will celebrate its first year of operation.

Selected by the Global Trip Award 2013 as one of the top 3 tourist attractions in Sweden, the museum continues to be a tremendous success, with more than 350,000 visitors in its opening year.

“We knew that the museum would be an interesting attraction at Djurgården, among all the other great destinations around us. But we couldn’t possibly have dreamed that we would attract so many visitors in such a short time,” said Mattias Hansson, CEO, ABBA The Museum.

The story of ABBA cannot be told without mentioning the fabulous reincarnation of the ABBA legacy; the musical ‘Mamma Mia!’, which premiered in London in 1999 and is now celebrating 15 successful years this year. Seen by more than 54 million in over 400 cities worldwide, Mamma Mia! is the 9th longest running show in Broadway history. Mamma Mia! The Movie starring Meryl Streep and Pierce Brosnan is the highest grossing live action musical film of all time.

Paying tribute to this incredible track record, ABBA The Museum is now displaying new ‘Mamma Mia!’ exhibits, featuring the three original Donna & The Dynamos costumes from London production. Visitors can also view the scene Does Your Mother Know, based on original props from the Stockholm production in 2005.

“Many of our visitors grew up with ABBA, later introducing them to their children through Mamma Mia!,” says curator Ingmarie Halling. “With the Mamma Mia! set design now in place, it feels like we have added a much requested missing link for our visitors.”

The new display will premiere on May 7, in celebration of the museum’s one year anniversary and all visitors are invited to dress up like ABBA, with free entrance for those who do!

Fast facts: ABBA The Museum/Swedish Music Hall of Fame
ABBA The Museum opened May 7, 2013 and is located in the newly built Swedish Music Hall of Fame, between Liljevalchs and Gröna Lund on the beautiful island of Djurgården in Stockholm. ABBA is one of the world’s most successful music groups with over 380 million records sold worldwide. The CD ABBA Gold is one of the most sold CD ever in United Kingdom with over 29 millions sold copies. ABBA The Museum presents an overview of the group, from ABBA’s formation in the early ’70s, the breakthrough with Waterloo in 1974, the major world tours, to the pause in 1982.

The exhibition ‘The History of Swedish Popular Music,’ features Swedish popular music from the early ‘20s to today, presenting artists such as Roxette, Robyn, Avicii, Entombed and First Aid Kit among others.

The building is also home to the Melody Hotel & Restaurant, a boutique hotel with 48 rooms and a fine-dining restaurant.

Tickets can be purchased at abbathemuseum.com

Hotel reservation can be made at www.melody.se

To read more about Mamma Mia! or book a ticket, please check www.mamma-mia.com

Press contact
ABBA The Museum: press@abbathemuseum.com, +46 (0) 73 934 35 05

Hours of operation
Open daily 10am – 8pm

Tickets
Adults: SEK 195

Free entrance for children up to 7 years of age.

Special rates for children between the ages of 7-15. Family tickets are also available.

Book your tickets at www.abbathemuseum.com

Stay updated at www.facebook.com/abbathemuseum

Address
Djurgårdsvägen 68, Djurgården, Stockholm

 

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Feasting on the best tapas in Palma with Agnetha!!!

28 04 2014

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On Instagram: Micael Bindefeld together with Agnetha on Mallorca having a tapas-dinner





Happy Birthday Björn

25 04 2014

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25 04 2014

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Frida Lyngstad thinks ABBA changed pop music

13 04 2014

Bjˆrn Ulvaeus, Anni-Frid Lyngstad

ABBA’s Frida Lyngstad thinks that after the 1970s success of her pop group, pop music was changed forever.

The ‘Waterloo’ hitmakers – including Bjorn Ulvaeus, Agnetha Faltskog and Benny Andersson – claim the music scene shifted when they started writing chart hits.

Frida told the Guardian newspaper’s G2: “The music scene changed with us – something like ABBA didn’t exist before, pop like that was not invented yet.”

After their huge success early on, Bjorn feels they should have stuck to what they were good at instead of trying to go in a different musical direction with songs like their 1973 single ‘Ring Ring’.

He explained: “If you look at the singles we released straight after ‘Waterloo’, we were trying to be more like The Sweet, a semi-glam rock group. Which was stupid because we were always a pop group.”

Bjorn was annoyed when critics claimed the band created hits to order and the songs didn’t have any heart.

He said: “Waterloo, Mamma Mia, Fernando, Dancing Queen, The Winner Takes It All … are they made to a formula?

“What is that formula? It’s totally the opposite. We never repeated ourselves. We worked so hard to find different styles every time.”


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ABBA: How we dealt with divorce

13 04 2014

Björn Ulvaeus and Frida Lyngstad have admitted it was “emotional” going through their respective divorces from band members Agnetha Fältskog and Benny Andersson while still continuing as ABBA.

The two iconic musicians started the quartet as two married couples with respective partners Agnetha Fältskog and Benny Andersson, but both split up before the group dissolved in 1981.

Currently promoting a reissue of their greatest hits, both Björn and Frida have revealed the heartache they had to go through in order to keep the band together.

“We felt like we had something so valuable in the group that, even though it was difficult, we didn’t want to break that up. And to prove it, we did some of our best stuff after that,” Björn told UK newspaper The Guardian, explaining the bleak lyrics of If It Wasn’t for the Nights were a direct reflection of his own state of mind. “There were times that last autumn I was with Agnetha that I had those nights myself. My lyrics were often based around fiction, but that must have been where that one came from.”

“Well when you did it, you made sure you did it very professionally,” Frida added when asked how it felt to sing about her failed marriage. “Of course there was a lot of emotion behind it and it was not always easy to continue recording.”

The Swedish songstress also revealed that while she didn’t feel she could leave the hugely successful band, she found another way of coping with her internal distress about the separation from Benny.

“I changed my whole style. I cut my hair very short, you know, very spiky and I became another woman in a way. So it manifested itself mostly like that,” she said.

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6 04 2014

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